China Rare Earth Magnet Limited

Magnetic Trivia - Things to Know About Rare Earth Magnets

 

Nanshan, Shenzhen -- (ReleaseWire) -- 02/21/2014 -- Rare earth magnets are strong permanent magnets comprising alloys and rare earth substances, such as samarium, praseodymium, neodymium, and thirteen more elements. Although, the discovery of these elements dates back to the 1800s, it was not until late sixties when a laboratory of the US Air Force used samarium and cobalt to make the largest magnetic anisotropy. The force created was so extreme that the magnetized object could easily resist being pulled in the opposite direction.

Two of the most popular products include strong neodymium magnets and cobalt-samarium magnets. The neodymium is more widely used because it is stronger while also being more reasonably priced making it affordable. Some of its applications include jewelry clasps, hard drives, and electric motors used in cordless tools. The combination of the cobalt-samarium magnets is more expensive and commonly used for applications by industrial manufacturers.

Some car manufacturing companies and clean technology companies are reported to seek replacements for the permanent magnets currently being used by them. Some leading car manufacturers are trying to find methods to reduce their dependence and usage of rare earth magnets. Nonetheless, car manufacturers continue to use these products widely and are always looking for permanent magnets for sale to help reduce their manufacturing expenses. Several representatives of world-renowned car manufacturing companies still believe such products to be the best available magnets.

Rare earth magnets are applied in different applications, which include roller coaster technologies, neodymium magnetic toys, self-powered flash lights, stop motion animation, diamagnetic levitation experimentation, and electric guitar pick-ups among others. While these products are widely used and hold importance in certain industries, these pose some hazards too. It is very important to be cautious and careful while handling such products. This is because when these magnets come in contact with each other, these split and break in small pieces with great speed. Additionally, when these magnets come into contact with the skin, these squeeze with much power.

The stability of the powerful neodymium magnets can be affected by a few factors. These excellent and widely used products are affected by temperature, time, and some other things; however, their impact is not very large. The stability is also affected by radiation, exposure to adverse fields, and inaccurate handling, and modifications in the reluctance. Time has very minor effect on rare earth magnets with about three percent loss of stability over a three-year period. Magnets exposed to more than the Curie temperature, the ability to magnetize is affected because it becomes paramagnetic.

If the products are exposed to permanent modifications due to air gap dimensions, their magnetic capabilities may reduce. In the event that the magnetic fields are in close proximity to the original rare earth, it may have demagnetizing effects. If the products are to be used in radioactive environments, it is recommended to pre-expose to ensure the capabilities are not affected. Magnetic products exposed to shocks, intense vibrations, or stress while handling can also affect their stability. However, in most instances such factors do not greatly impact the loss of magnetic force that diminishes their applications.

About China Rare Earth Magnet Limited
Established in 1985, China Rare Earth Magnet Limited provides a large variety of strong and powerful neodymium magnets. Most people who require these products do not know where to find permanent magnets for sale and sending an inquiry to the company will elicit a quick and favorable response.

For Media Contact:
China Rare Earth Magnet Limited
Room 705 – 707, Ruisi Center, No. 9030 Shennan Rd,
Nanshan District, Shenzhen, China 518053
Phone: +86 755 26923096 / +86 755 86621665
Fax: + 86 755 26915592
Email: china@magnetndfeb.com
Website: http://www.magnetndfeb.com/