Vascular PRN

Vascular PRN President Recognizes Deep Vein Thrombosis Awareness Month

March is Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Awareness Month.

 

Tampa, FL -- (ReleaseWire) -- 03/18/2014 -- According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), between 300,000 and 600,000 people in the United States are affected by DVT or pulmonary embolism (PE) each year.

Greg Grambor is president of Vascular PRN, a national distributor of pneumatic compression devices for the prevention of DVT. He explained what DVT is and outlined some of its dangers.

“Deep vein thrombosis is the formation of a blood clot in a deep vein, usually within the legs,” Grambor said. “That can cause swelling and pain. If the clot then breaks free and lodges in another part of the body, it is called an “embolism.” Embolisms are very dangerous. They can be very damaging or fatal, especially if they occur in the heart, brain or lungs.”

Pneumatic compression devices are worn on a patient's legs to help prevent DVT. They gently and rhythmically squeeze the legs to enhance blood flow, prevent blood pooling and reduce the risk of clotting.

“Extended immobilization and recent surgery are top risk factors for DVT,” Grambor added. “That's why it's so important for doctors at hospitals and nursing homes to know about the health benefits and cost effectiveness of compression therapy. But it's also important to recognize that even an airline flight can increase the risk of DVT in the short term after movement has been restricted for several hours. We recently began offering the Triple Play, which is perfect for travelers. This battery-operated compression device will run for 17 hours between charges, allowing uninterrupted therapy for a full day of traveling.”

Because this is DVT Awareness Month, it is important for everyone — particularly those with restricted mobility — to know the warning signs of DVT. They include swelling in one or both legs; tenderness or pain in one or both legs, sometimes only upon standing or walking; discolored or red skin in the legs; visible surface veins; and leg fatigue.

“Through awareness and the widespread use of compression therapy, we can work toward a significant reduction in the incidence and complications of DVT,” Grambor said.

Learn more at http://www.vascularprn.com or call 1.800.886.4331.